Discussion:
What does 72 mean
(too old to reply)
Kenneth A. Christiansen
2002-09-16 15:53:00 UTC
Permalink
I have a question. We all know what 88 means (Love and Kisses)
and 73 (Best regards and goodbye) but I am hearing 72 both on
the air and some of the letters on this reflector. Can someone
define 72 so we can all know what it means.
73

Ken Christiansen W0CZ
K2-1031
Ron D'Eau Claire
2002-09-16 16:20:00 UTC
Permalink
I have a question. We all know what 88 means (Love and Kisses)
and 73 (Best regards and goodbye) but I am hearing 72 both on the air
and some of the letters on this reflector. Can someone define 72 so we
can all know what it means. 73

Ken Christiansen W0CZ
K2-1031
-------------

Some of the QRP fraternity use it to indicate that they are QRPers...
It's 73, only a little less, Hi.

For me it's still 73 (Best Regards), from

Ron AC7AC
K2 # 1289

...guess I'm just a traditionalist.
Phil Wheeler
2002-09-17 07:04:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kenneth A. Christiansen
I have a question. We all know what 88 means (Love and Kisses)
Nothing is safe any more. Team names like Indians are not politically
correct.

And I read a few weeks ago that 88 is not PC, either: Apparently it is
being used as a symbol by neo-nazi groups.

73 (hopefully safe!), Phil
COLIN WHITMORE
2002-09-16 16:22:01 UTC
Permalink
Ah, welcome to the QRP community. 72 is the QRP signature to 73.

72 ES GD,
N=D8YGY
Colin =20
=20
----- Original Message -----
From: Kenneth A. Christiansen
Sent: Monday, September 16, 2002 8:47 AM
To: ***@mailman.qth.net
Subject: [Elecraft] What does 72 mean
=20
I have a question. We all know what 88 means (Love and Kisses) =20
and 73 (Best regards and goodbye) but I am hearing 72 both on
the air and some of the letters on this reflector. Can someone
define 72 so we can all know what it means.
73

Ken Christiansen W0CZ =20
K2-1031


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Postings must be plain text (no HTML or attachments). =20
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Kevin Cozens
2002-09-16 18:18:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kenneth A. Christiansen
I have a question. We all know what 88 means (Love and Kisses)
and 73 (Best regards and goodbye) but I am hearing 72 both on
the air and some of the letters on this reflector. Can someone
define 72 so we can all know what it means.
I found the following quote:
* "72" means "have fun with QRP!" in QRP parlance.
on the page at http://users.erols.com/tjmc/liqrp.htm

At
http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/academic/agriculture/agronomy/ham/QRP/20010627.qrp.v02_n233
you can find the explanation:
72 is the QRP version of 73. Except a QRP station doesn't have
quite enough oomph to make it to 73.


The first explanation of 72 I remember seeing was in a QRP publication. I
don't remember if it was in an ARRL QRP book or one of the magazines I
received from a QRP club. The explanation had to do with the fact that QRP
operators do more with less. Its the explanation I prefer. You are free to
pick the explanation which you like best.


Cheers!

Kevin. (http://www.interlog.com/~kcozens/)

Owner of Elecraft K2 #2172 |"What are we going to do today, Borg?"
E-mail:kcozens at interlog dot com|"Same thing we always do, Pinkutus:
Packet:***@ve3yra.#con.on.ca.na| Try to assimilate the world!"
#include <disclaimer/favourite> | -Pinkutus & the Borg
Ron D'Eau Claire
2002-09-16 22:24:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ron D'Eau Claire
...guess I'm just a traditionalist.
then maybe 73/2 would appeal more to you?

73(/2), Eddi ._._.

I don't have any quarrel with anyone who says "72". I take it as a QRP
equivalent of 73. I'm not criticizing that choice at all. I only said
that I don't use it because I enjoy the authentic connection to our
roots. These numbers come from the standards set up for handling
messages back in the railroad telegraph and Western Union days. I
believe it was known as the '92 code' and assigned meanings to the
numbers from 1 to 92, much like the "Q" codes we use today.

As for doing something different now, I can't recall a QRP QSO in which
our rigs and power levels weren't discussed, so what's the point?

If that should happen, it was because there was something more important
to discuss was at hand. So why the distraction?

I do sign /QRP when calling running 5 watts or less. That's to alert
other stations who may be looking for QRP contacts. And that's in
accordance with very long-standing practice started by the FCC decades
ago and something the FCC currently recommends American hams use as
needed to designate any unusual status of the station.

If enough operators use "72" long enough, it will eventually become
incorporated into usage no doubt. Like another of the old number codes,
"30" that means "End of Message" . 30 in landline Morse was sent as
di-di-di-dah-dit, daaaaah. (The long dash was a zero as those of us who
use manual keys are still apt to send it). Over time it started being
sent as di-di-di-dah-di-dah which is usually written as the prosign SK
today and used by Hams world wide to signify "End of Message".

Something similar may happen to 73 due to the use of 72 nowadays. I'll
leave that for future generations to sort out.

With that I'll go "21" (stop and eat) for now. It's lunch time.

Ron AC7AC
K2 # 1289
Helmut Usbeck
2002-09-17 01:28:00 UTC
Permalink
72 in the radiogram code, which was bases on the land telegraph code
means "wishing you and yours the best this holiday season"

--Helm. WB2ADT
Post by Ron D'Eau Claire
Post by Ron D'Eau Claire
...guess I'm just a traditionalist.
then maybe 73/2 would appeal more to you?
73(/2), Eddi ._._.
I don't have any quarrel with anyone who says "72". I take it as a QRP
equivalent of 73. I'm not criticizing that choice at all. I only said
that I don't use it because I enjoy the authentic connection to our
roots. These numbers come from the standards set up for handling
messages back in the railroad telegraph and Western Union days. I
believe it was known as the '92 code' and assigned meanings to the
numbers from 1 to 92, much like the "Q" codes we use today.
As for doing something different now, I can't recall a QRP QSO in which
our rigs and power levels weren't discussed, so what's the point?
If that should happen, it was because there was something more important
to discuss was at hand. So why the distraction?
I do sign /QRP when calling running 5 watts or less. That's to alert
other stations who may be looking for QRP contacts. And that's in
accordance with very long-standing practice started by the FCC decades
ago and something the FCC currently recommends American hams use as
needed to designate any unusual status of the station.
If enough operators use "72" long enough, it will eventually become
incorporated into usage no doubt. Like another of the old number codes,
"30" that means "End of Message" . 30 in landline Morse was sent as
di-di-di-dah-dit, daaaaah. (The long dash was a zero as those of us who
use manual keys are still apt to send it). Over time it started being
sent as di-di-di-dah-di-dah which is usually written as the prosign SK
today and used by Hams world wide to signify "End of Message".
Something similar may happen to 73 due to the use of 72 nowadays. I'll
leave that for future generations to sort out.
With that I'll go "21" (stop and eat) for now. It's lunch time.
Ron AC7AC
K2 # 1289
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k***@juno.com
2002-09-16 22:38:02 UTC
Permalink
Ron, AC7AC wrote:

"Something similar may happen to 73 due to the use of 72 nowadays. I'll
leave that for future generations to sort out."
==========
Now that only 5 wpm is necessary for even an Extra Class license, let's
hope that there *are* future generations that still use CW!!!!!

73, de Earl, K6SE
Ron D'Eau Claire
2002-09-16 23:36:01 UTC
Permalink
This post might be inappropriate. Click to display it.
Ron D'Eau Claire
2002-09-17 02:37:01 UTC
Permalink
Certainly, there are variations in the codes. I was referring to the
code printed in the 1860's (I believe it was) by G.M. Dodge, in his
book, "The Telegraph Instructor". Like Q-codes today they were modified
by various systems. For example, in 1864 Morse's Telegraphic Institute
in New York defined 73 as "Compliments to ______".

Now who would be a greater reference than Morse? Well, there were a
number of busier circuits.

Things change over the years. And they are changing now, Hi!

73,

Ron AC7AC
K2 # 1289

72 in the radiogram code, which was bases on the land telegraph code
means "wishing you and yours the best this holiday season"

--Helm. WB2ADT
k***@earthlink.net
2002-09-17 04:21:01 UTC
Permalink
This email got me thinking so I looked up '92 code' and found this site:

http://members.tripod.com/morse_telegraph_club/informat.htm

Best regards, (I think this is the current meaning for 73 but I may be wrong :)
Kevin. KD5ONS
Post by Helmut Usbeck
72 in the radiogram code, which was bases on the land telegraph code
means "wishing you and yours the best this holiday season"
--Helm. WB2ADT
Post by Ron D'Eau Claire
Post by Ron D'Eau Claire
...guess I'm just a traditionalist.
then maybe 73/2 would appeal more to you?
73(/2), Eddi ._._.
I don't have any quarrel with anyone who says "72". I take it as a QRP
equivalent of 73. I'm not criticizing that choice at all. I only said
that I don't use it because I enjoy the authentic connection to our
roots. These numbers come from the standards set up for handling
messages back in the railroad telegraph and Western Union days. I
believe it was known as the '92 code' and assigned meanings to the
numbers from 1 to 92, much like the "Q" codes we use today.
As for doing something different now, I can't recall a QRP QSO in which
our rigs and power levels weren't discussed, so what's the point?
If that should happen, it was because there was something more important
to discuss was at hand. So why the distraction?
I do sign /QRP when calling running 5 watts or less. That's to alert
other stations who may be looking for QRP contacts. And that's in
accordance with very long-standing practice started by the FCC decades
ago and something the FCC currently recommends American hams use as
needed to designate any unusual status of the station.
If enough operators use "72" long enough, it will eventually become
incorporated into usage no doubt. Like another of the old number codes,
"30" that means "End of Message" . 30 in landline Morse was sent as
di-di-di-dah-dit, daaaaah. (The long dash was a zero as those of us who
use manual keys are still apt to send it). Over time it started being
sent as di-di-di-dah-di-dah which is usually written as the prosign SK
today and used by Hams world wide to signify "End of Message".
Something similar may happen to 73 due to the use of 72 nowadays. I'll
leave that for future generations to sort out.
With that I'll go "21" (stop and eat) for now. It's lunch time.
Ron AC7AC
K2 # 1289
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Postings must be plain text (no HTML or attachments).
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Ron D'Eau Claire
2002-09-17 07:34:00 UTC
Permalink
That's interesting, Phil, but I never wrote what you are quoting below!

Ron AC7AC
K2 # 1289
Post by Kenneth A. Christiansen
I have a question. We all know what 88 means (Love and Kisses)
Nothing is safe any more. Team names like Indians are not politically
correct.

And I read a few weeks ago that 88 is not PC, either: Apparently it is
being used as a symbol by neo-nazi groups.

73 (hopefully safe!), Phil


_______________________________________________
Elecraft mailing list: ***@mailman.qth.net
You must be a list member to post to the list.
Postings must be plain text (no HTML or attachments).
See: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
Elecraft Web Page: http://www.elecraft.com
Thom LaCosta
2002-09-17 10:19:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ron D'Eau Claire
roots. These numbers come from the standards set up for handling
messages back in the railroad telegraph and Western Union days. I
believe it was known as the '92 code' and assigned meanings to the
numbers from 1 to 92, much like the "Q" codes we use today.
Thanks for the jumping-off point....I did a search on 92 code and found
this very interesting site:

http://members.tripod.com/morse_telegraph_club/informat.htm

Thom

***@baltimoremd.com Thom LaCosta K3HRN Webmaster
http://www.baltimoremd.com/ Baltimore's Home Page
http://www.baltimorehon.com/ Home of the Baltimore Lexicon
http://www.zerobeat.net Home of The QRP Web Ring
and Drake Mail List Pages
Bruce Rattray
2002-09-17 16:53:00 UTC
Permalink
Maybe 72 could be used by retired persons as I feel like I'm on a
permanent "holiday season" since I retired in January... ;-))

..72/73 - Bruce (VE5RC+VE5QRP) QRP-C#1 QRP-L#886 ARCI#9683 Zombie#272
A-1 Operator Club - 10/10# 944 - QRP Borg#1 - Whiner#10 -
- VE5QRP SOC#11 - VE5RC SOC#12 - oo#148 - K2#2032 - COG#15 -
"QRP! How sweet it is!" "I am da man wit "DAH" paddle!"
Post by Helmut Usbeck
72 in the radiogram code, which was bases on the land telegraph code
means "wishing you and yours the best this holiday season"
--Helm. WB2ADT
Post by Ron D'Eau Claire
Post by Ron D'Eau Claire
...guess I'm just a traditionalist.
then maybe 73/2 would appeal more to you?
73(/2), Eddi ._._.
I don't have any quarrel with anyone who says "72". I take it as a QRP
equivalent of 73. I'm not criticizing that choice at all. I only said
that I don't use it because I enjoy the authentic connection to our
roots. These numbers come from the standards set up for handling
messages back in the railroad telegraph and Western Union days. I
believe it was known as the '92 code' and assigned meanings to the
numbers from 1 to 92, much like the "Q" codes we use today.
As for doing something different now, I can't recall a QRP QSO in which
our rigs and power levels weren't discussed, so what's the point?
If that should happen, it was because there was something more important
to discuss was at hand. So why the distraction?
I do sign /QRP when calling running 5 watts or less. That's to alert
other stations who may be looking for QRP contacts. And that's in
accordance with very long-standing practice started by the FCC decades
ago and something the FCC currently recommends American hams use as
needed to designate any unusual status of the station.
If enough operators use "72" long enough, it will eventually become
incorporated into usage no doubt. Like another of the old number codes,
"30" that means "End of Message" . 30 in landline Morse was sent as
di-di-di-dah-dit, daaaaah. (The long dash was a zero as those of us who
use manual keys are still apt to send it). Over time it started being
sent as di-di-di-dah-di-dah which is usually written as the prosign SK
today and used by Hams world wide to signify "End of Message".
Something similar may happen to 73 due to the use of 72 nowadays. I'll
leave that for future generations to sort out.
With that I'll go "21" (stop and eat) for now. It's lunch time.
Ron AC7AC
K2 # 1289
_______________________________________________
You must be a list member to post to the list.
Postings must be plain text (no HTML or attachments).
See: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
Elecraft Web Page: http://www.elecraft.com
_______________________________________________
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Postings must be plain text (no HTML or attachments).
See: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
Elecraft Web Page: http://www.elecraft.com
Phil Wheeler
2002-09-17 17:50:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bruce Rattray
Maybe 72 could be used by retired persons as I feel like I'm on a
permanent "holiday season" since I retired in January... ;-))
Maybe we should be required to use our ages, Bruce :-\

73, Phil (no, I'm not 73!)

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